Television Producer Job Description: Top Duties and Requirements

A Television Producer, or TV Producer, oversees and controls technical and artistic aspects of television productions. Their main duties include developing a television show concept, raising or sourcing funding based on their budget for the project, and hiring a team to produce the show.

Build a Job Description

Television Producer duties and responsibilities

Television Producers are one of the highest-ranking employees in a television show production. Because of this, they have a number of duties and responsibilities, including the following:

  • Develop or find new show concepts 
  • Source funding to create the show 
  • Hire a team to produce the show, including a director, film crew, and talent
  • Create a budget and timeline for the project 
  • Obtain the necessary rights to any books, songs, plays, or other works used
  • Assist with writing and editing the script 
  • Coordinate production meetings and shoots
  • Supervise the entire production process

What does a Television Producer do?

A Television Producer manages both the creative and administrative aspects of a television show’s production from pre-production to post-production. This includes a number of responsibilities, such as making financial decisions, like creating a budget and raising the necessary funds, handling negotiations and contracts, hiring a television crew, and creating a production schedule. 

Television Producers often have the final say or heavy input in creative aspects of the production as well, such as its script, sets, editing, costumes, and talent. They keep the show’s production on track by supervising the entire project and holding regular meetings with the director and other executives to discuss progress and adherence to the budget and schedule.

Television Producer skills and qualifications

Television Producers need to be creative to think of and develop new television shows. They must also hold the following prerequisite skills and qualifications to perform their duties effectively: 

  • Strong leadership skills
  • Ability to plan budgets and schedules strategically 
  • Excellent interpersonal skills
  • Able to multi-task and manage time well 
  • Experience using television equipment, such as cameras and microphones
  • Willing to work with and motivate a team 
  • Understanding of common writing and editing software, such as Microsoft Office and Adobe Creative Suite
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills

Television Producer experience requirements

As a Television Producer is an executive role in the TV and film industry, candidates need prior experience. Many candidates seek internships or co-op programs with their school to break into the film and television industry. This leads them to an entry-level role in television or film as a Production Assistant or something similar to get formal work experience. 

Experience in a leadership role is also important for Television Producers, so becoming a Production Manager is the next best step. After three to five years of experience in the industry, candidates may consider creating a portfolio to apply for Television Producer roles. A portfolio with independent short films or videos that the candidate produced is a great way to see their experience. 

Television Producer education and training requirements

Television Producer candidates require a strong educational background in order to create and oversee successful productions. A bachelor’s degree or college diploma in broadcasting, television and film production, film studies, or a related field is typically necessary for Television Producer candidates. You should consider candidates with a postgraduate degree in a similar field an asset as well.

Job salary expectations

According to Indeed Salaries, the average salary for a Television Producer in Canada is $75,494 per year. This salary varies based on the company, experience, and location.

Job description samples for similar positions

Here are some other job description samples available if this is not quite what you’re looking for:

Television Producer job description FAQs

Who reports to a Television Producer?

Television Producers tend to be the highest-ranking member of a television crew unless they have a co-producer, which would be their equal. So, the entire crew reports to the Television Producer, including, but not limited to the following employees:

  • Casting Director
  • Head Writer 
  • Screenwriter
  • Story Editor
  • Researcher
  • Set Designer 
  • Production Designer
  • Director
  • Make-up Artist 
  • Boom Operator
  • Gaffer
  • Production Manager 
  • Stunt Coordinator
  • Editor
  • Publicist
  • Camera Operator 

What is the difference between a Television Producer and Television Director?

Television Producers and Directors work closely together to ensure they create a successful television show, their roles sometimes even overlap. Television Directors focus more on the creative aspects of production than Television Producers do. Television Producers provide feedback or pitch creative ideas, but they focus more on administrative tasks, such as creating a budget and a production schedule. Directors only focus on creative tasks, such as transferring the script to the screen and setting the tone of the television show.

How can you make your Television Producer job description stand out?

When hiring a Television Producer, having a unique job description is important to find the right candidate. Television Producers will have experience with different genres, so including the genre of television you’re looking to create in your job description is important. This will help narrow down your search.

What qualities make a good Television Producer?

Television Producers should have a variety of skills and qualities, such as strong communication and interpersonal skills. One of the most important qualities Television Producers should have, though, is strong leadership skills. A television show can only be successful if the entire crew works together well, and this starts with the Producer. A good Television Producer should be able to motivate and encourage their crew.

Job Description Examples

    *Indeed provides this information as a courtesy to users of this site. Please note that we are not your career or legal advisor, and none of the information provided herein guarantees a job offer.