How to Write an Editor Resume (With Templates and Example)

By Indeed Editorial Team

Published January 3, 2022

The Indeed Editorial Team comprises a diverse and talented team of writers, researchers and subject matter experts equipped with Indeed's data and insights to deliver useful tips to help guide your career journey.

Those who want to apply for editor positions may wonder what does an effective editor resume look like and how to write one. These resumes focus on the collection of your professional experience and skills. By knowing more about resumes for editors, you can develop a more effective resume and increase your chances of being hired. In this article, we define resumes for editors, provide you with a guide to writing an editor resume, discuss several tips for editors, and provide both templates and examples for candidates.

What is an editor resume?

An editor resume refers to resumes customized for job openings in the editing industry. These resumes discuss previous experience in editing and a candidate's ability to follow organizational guidelines. Editors review content for errors and determine the best ways to communicate messages to their target audience. They work with writers, marketers, and other creative professionals to perfect texts and content. The average national salary for editors is $47,791 per year.

Editors typically work in offices, both onsite and in remote locations, and they use desktop computers and various devices and software. Careers in this sector typically focus on media and communications. Self-employed editors frequently work on social media campaigns and novels.

How to write a resume for editors

Here's a guide to help you write a resume for editors:

1. Include contact information

The contact information you include provides hiring managers with a method to contact you if they require more information. For example, they can request additional references or ask to schedule interviews by calling the phone number you provide. This is the first section you include in your resume, which consists of your preferred name, phone number, email address, and the city and province in which you live.

Related: How to Become a Chief Editor

2. Review professional summary or objective

When writing your resume for editors, it's beneficial to consider whether you want to include a professional summary or resume objective. Resume summaries are short descriptions of your qualifications that describe why you're a strong candidate for a particular job position. Resume objectives differ from this because they're brief statements that describe your career goals and the industry you want to work in.

When writing your summary or objective, you may want to communicate how many years you previously worked in the field. If you lack experience in the industry, resume objectives are best because they describe your future goals rather than your experience.

Related: How to Be an Editor (With Steps and FAQs)

3. Include academic history

When including your academic history in your resume, you typically do so by listing your post-secondary degrees in reverse-chronological order. If you have a lack of experience in your industry, you can also include your GPA or letter grade to fill space. You may also want to list any additional certifications or licenses that improve your application in your academic section.

Related: Copy Editing vs. Proofreading: Definitions, Skills, and Duties

4. Include relevant skills

This resume section includes skills specific to editors, along with skills that show your ability to work in the field. These skills help the hiring manager determine whether you're the best candidate for the open job position. If you don't know which skills to use, consider reviewing the job posting for skills that the hiring manager determines to be relevant.

Tips for writing resumes for editors

Here's a list of tips for those who want to write a resume for editors:

Use keywords

It's beneficial to review the company's job postings, websites, and social media to determine which keywords to use. This provides you with important information to include in your resume and shows hiring managers that you have the required experience to succeed in job positions. For example, job postings for editors may ask that candidates have experience with line editing. When writing your resume, you can then decide whether you have this experience and include it in your accomplishments or skills.

Choose your format

When writing your resume for editors, you may want to consider whether you use a chronological or functional resume. Chronological resumes focus on professional experience and your ability to transfer previous experience to new positions. These resumes provide hiring managers with an overview of your experience by including bulleted lists of duties under each job position. In these resumes, you can also list your educational experience and certifications in the same section. Your last section typically includes your skills and educational experience. Functional resumes differ from chronological resumes because they focus on your skills and your abilities.

Functional resumes are best for those who lack professional or practical experience. If you're a recent graduate or if you haven't worked as an editor before, you may want to choose a functional resume. They focus on how you can benefit employers rather than how you previously benefitted employers. These resumes also show hiring managers that although you have a lack of experience, you can still succeed in the job position. Combined resumes include features of both chronological and functional resumes. They include fewer job positions and provide more room for accomplishments and skills.

Include your diverse skill set

A resume for editors typically includes a variety of hard and soft skills, and functional resumes require you to describe how you can use those skills to benefit organizations. For example, editors use interpersonal and customer service skills to develop professional relationships with clients. This may help you develop a strong network of clients.

Skills required for editors

Here's a list of required skills for editors:

Attention to detail

Editors require a strong attention to detail because they review texts and content for errors in grammar and punctuation. They use this attention to detail to review repetition in phrases and to discover the best ways to convey messages. Editors also use attention to detail when reviewing social media campaigns to help ensure that the company's branding is seamless. For example, companies require the same font and slogans throughout campaigns and websites.

Communication skills

Editors use communication skills when interacting with colleagues and clients. These skills help them develop a holistic understanding of the required content and intended message of clients and organizations. Communication skills also help editors network and discuss content with their colleagues.

Creativity

These professionals use creativity when discovering new ways to describe intended messages. For example, they require strong creativity skills when discussing similar topics in their content and when finding new ways to improve the writing of others. Creativity also helps them find synonyms with more ease.

Decision-making skills

Editors require strong decision-making skills because they make fast decisions about the best writing techniques. These professionals also use their decision-making skills when choosing synonyms or changing language. They can determine which media to use for copywriting tasks and provide input into book covers.

Resume template examples for editors

Here are examples of resume templates for editors:

Chronological resume

Here's an example of a chronological resume template:

[First name, last name]
[City, province]
[Phone number]
[Email address]

Resume summary
[Describe your experience, skills, academic background, and achievements in a maximum of three sentences.]

Professional experience
[Previous job position]
[Previous employer], [City, province], [Employment dates]

  • [Responsibility]

  • [Responsibility]

  • [Responsibility]

[Repeat for multiple positions]

Education
[Your program name or qualifications]
[Institution name], [Graduation date]

Skills

  • [Relevant skill]

  • [Relevant skill]

  • [Relevant skill]

Functional resume

Here's an example of a functional resume template:

[First name, last name]
[City, province]
[Phone number]
[Email address]

Resume summary
[Describe your experience, skills, academic background, and achievements in a maximum of three sentences.]

Relevant skills
Skill 1

  • [Achievement or description]

  • [Achievement or description]

  • [Achievement or description]

Skill 2

  • [Achievement or description]

  • [Achievement or description]

  • [Achievement or description]

Skill 3

  • [Achievement or description]

  • [Achievement or description]

  • [Achievement or description]

Work history

  • [Job title], [Previous employer], [Employment dates]

  • [Job title], [Previous employer], [Employment dates]

  • [Job title], [Previous employer], [Employment dates]

Resume example for editors

Here's an example of a chronological resume:

Sam Bane
Montreal, Quebec
999-990-9898
sambane@email.com

Resume summary
Looking for an opportunity to use my strong communication and attention to detail to develop relationships with writers. I have more than 10 years of experience in the editing field and hope to positively impact your company as I did in previous job positions.

Professional experience
Editor
Editing Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, August 2010-January 2015

  • Developed social media campaigns with the help of marketing teams and copywriters.

  • Conducted line editing to help ensure proper grammar and punctuation in content.

  • Improved efficiency by 76% in the editing department by implementing new procedures and processes.

Education
Editing school of Montreal
Montreal University, May 2019

Skills

  • Bilingual

  • Copy editing

  • Line editing

Salary figures reflect data listed on the quoted websites at time of writing. Salaries‌ ‌may‌ ‌‌vary‌‌ ‌depending‌ ‌on‌ ‌the‌ ‌hiring‌ ‌organization‌ ‌and‌ ‌a‌ ‌candidate's‌ ‌experience,‌ ‌academic‌ background‌, ‌and‌ ‌location.‌

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