Starbucks

7.3K reviews

Starbucks Employee Reviews

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Fun loving work environment. Small and everyone feels close.
Barista (Former Employee), Kelowna, BCSeptember 21, 2012
Pros: friendly staff, free coffee, company benefits.
Cons: if one staff member doesn't get alone with another, it makes the whole work environment become difficult.
I have always been a fan of Starbucks for the atmosphere and friendly staff, which is why I chose to apply to work there.

A typical day of work included grinding coffee beans for drip coffee, adding whole beans to the hot coffee bar for espresso drinks, and assembling the machine (the parts are sterilized and stored overnight). Setting up the pastry display (some of this was done after the store opened).

After opening the store we serve the customers their coffee drinks (many of the early morning people are regular customers), serve pastries and foods.

Either working on cash (which includes serving and preparing drip coffee, heating and serving pastries and foods), hot bar (espresso machine), or cold bar (frappucino and iced beverages). All staff will clean up as much as possible. There was a task list which included all of the cleaning tasks to be done each day. Some tasks were performed more than once every day (including cleaning washrooms, dishes, and washing/sweeping the floors).

I learned to create very delicious coffee, tea, and non-coffee beverages. I also learned about Starbucks' history, and about different types of coffees from different regions, and how the different types of coffees are harvested and dried, which affects the tastes.

The hardest part of the job was when other staff members did not do their jobs. An example is where was one girl who didn't like doing the front of store work, including helping customers and making drinks, would hide in the back room texting or calling, or being on the floor (customer area) flirting with her boyfriend. This girl – more... was not a manager or supervisor, but she worked at the company for a long time and had a lot of influence. After I talked to her and the supervisors about how I was left alone to do all of the work, nothing changed. The atmosphere became negative, and it wasn't the way Starbucks should be. It affected the level of customer service, and the mind set of all staff members. So I left the company. The wages are also low. When I started the wage was $9/hour, which was minimum wage at the time. But the first time I applied to work for Starbucks the wage was $8/hour (before minimum wage was raised). Although they talk about fair wages and treating farmers well, they should pay their employees more than minimum wage. It is a job that has a lot of learning and there is a lot of work to be done. The staff are friendly, knowledgeable, and busy. They deserve more than minimum wage,

My manager and coworkers were very kind and fun to be around. The manager was really nice and understanding. She called us her girls and tried her best to accommodate everyone's needs. Even the girl who did not see eye-to-eye with me, was also a really nice girl, and she was very competent, when she did work. But our work personalities were not compatible.

The most enjoyable part of the job was when customers were happy with the service and goods provided to them. It was also enjoyable having fun with coworkers, and learning about coffee. – less
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A company with a heart, which prides itself in it's investment in its partners, its customers, and its shareholders.
Store Manager (Former Employee), TorontoNovember 17, 2014
Pros: excellent benefits, opportunities for advancement, vacation time.
Cons: unstable schedule that often resulted in overtime that salaried persons are not paid for.
The typical day at Starbucks as a store manager was shaped by the expectations relayed to the store manager by the district manager, which in turn were determined by the key initiatives of the company on the one hand, and the flow of business on the other. For me, those factors resulted in working shifts from approximately 6:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Monday's were our administrative days. I was required to schedule and monitor labor, use our retail hourly hiring system to identify potential candidates to interview, hire, and train, analyze P&L statements, as well as weekly tracking systems to identify strengths, and opportunities of the business, and to read, communicate, and delegate any key tasks relayed to the team from head office. On other days, the store manager acted as a shift supervisor. This involved general opening tasks, monitoring inventory as I placed the daily food and milk orders, deploying partners to key positions based on their individual strengths during peak hours, run breaks, and calculate, record, and deposit the till drops. Central to everyday was the needs of our customers. I led the floor by example by standing on the till, or expediting service to ensure that I was providing a smile, and doing everything I could to ensure that any customer that left our store left feeling that they had had a legendary experience.

This position furnished me with the opportunity to attend several top of the line management courses, and therefore I learned a great deal about inventory management, scheduling labor, identifying potential candidates for recruitment, coaching – more... partners with respect to performance, and operating a sense of urgency as a leader.

I reported directly to the district manager. Our district manager was herself a tenured starbucks partner with a sharp eye for detail, a desire to teach, and an outstanding ability to instill a sense of confidence, and personal responsibility in her team.

I had the pleasure of building appropriate, professional working relationships with the team I was selected to lead. I communicated, set, and followed up on the expectations given me by our head office, and sought to instill the same pride, confidence, and sense of responsibility in my team that my district manager instilled in me.

The most challenging aspect of the job was the tax on one's personal life that management in retail can take. Some weeks the business needs required me to work 70+ hours.

The most rewarding aspect of the job was the opportunity to bring a little light into somebody's day, and the successful execution of that goal. To make a person smile with something as simple as a cup of coffee; to be an oasis from the noise of daily life was truly a privelege. – less
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Challenging and re-building environment
Barista (Former Employee), TorontoJanuary 25, 2014
Pros: free coffee, lot's of connections with people
Cons: too little time to learn everyone around me
A typical day at work was either funny or upsetting - depending on what standpoint I took.
As a mature person I needed to re-connect with my teenage hood for one more time. I learned to demolish my values and re-build them, such as: I learned that people come and go without saying hi, bye, thank you or please. I learned that sometimes the 4pm starting time means 4:10 or even later. I learned that things are floating around, the milk ends up with the orange juice and vice versa. I learned that sometimes it is possible to fight with physics - despite of the common belief - and for instance the fridge door can be left open for half an hour, especially when the management forgets to close it.
I needed to learn to distinguish between good and bad, and to maintain my personality in an environment that was not supporting my personality features. I needed to learn to go with the flow, to keep my chin up, my humour and my enthusiasm. I needed to learn that things are beyond my control sometimes. I needed to learn not to give the right to anyone to make me feel inferior or bad.
I learned to be a strong person, a person with values, faith and integrity.
The management was a couple of young people with little or no experience, and therefore they needed us, the baristas to inform them about the details of the job. Three of my shift supervisors were promoted to be assistant managers after me explaining them the basic communicational rules and shaping their skills in this direction.
My co-workers were mostly young people from different colleges and I still keep in touch with them. We have – more... formulated a Facebook group which is a living charette, we have representatives from every walks of life.
The hardest part of the job was dealing with the burned-out, apathical manager who only saw us as coffee-servers and not community makers.
The most enjoyable part was to see how the connections are being established and functioning between individuals. During my five years of Starbucks I have created several groups and communities including the "Russian -speaking people" the "Divorced fathers" and the " Dancers" group who came to our café on a regular basis, and where us, baristas acted like organizers, mediators, students, and bartenders. – less
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Overworked, underpaid
Supervisor (Former Employee), OakvilleOctober 2, 2014
Pros: medical and dental (if you make the deadlines, twice a year)
Cons: hours, pay
I was fortunate to be in a store with great co-workers and a great manager, however the expectations and workload for the amount of money (minimum wage) was ridiculous. Typically the floor is run with one supervisor and two Baristas (ideally). Opening means you're at work at 5am and typically work until 1:30pm. Closes start at 2pm and end at 10:30pm. At 7am the morning rush starts and hopefully you have three people working, it will last 1 to 2 hours ending around 8:30-9am If you work at a busier store it never really ends. Following the morning rush you have the lunch rush, which is really based on your proximity to a high school (we had two). Finally there is the evening rush which is usually after dinner and if you work at a "slow store" your probably gonna see very few customers coming in after 7:30pm.

Side Tasks
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While you're ringing through endless drink orders and your fellow barista is making these drinks you're expected to maintain the pastry case rotate coffees every 30 minutes (which means you're brewing coffee every 10 minutes) clean the entire store, bus tables, stock the condiment stand(s) maintain the bathrooms, clean the dishes, Urnex the coffee urns, heat sandwiches, stock ice, mop the floors and mats in both the cafe and behind the counter, and stock RTDE (the fridge with the sandwiches and juices). Supervisors must delegate and assist with all these tasks as well as run breaks, complete food and coffee orders, balance tills, drop tips, count in and out of the safe, and run the deposits to the banks daily, as well as daily inventory and markout – more... counts. Furthermore there are setup days for new seasons, full inventory counts, and QASA (Quality Assurance) audits. Closing entails sanitizing the entire store as well as stocking and cleaning the bathrooms, taking out all of the garbage and putting away the food order for the next day, which will also be dated with expiration stickers. These are all considered to be the "side tasks" as your main focus is the customer no matter how ridiculous an order or request (but that's the service industry).

Wages
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Barista: Minimum Wage ($11/hr)
Supervisor: $13/hr

My store was fun because of the people I worked with, however I have been in some horrible stores. – less
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Best Job for Student in the Food Service Industry
Shift Supervisor/Barista (Current Employee), Mississauga, ONSeptember 5, 2015
Pros: Fun place, free stuff, amazing perks
Cons: District and Regional Managers
Working at Starbucks has been one of the best experiences of my life. I started there with zero dollars to my name, coming out of a 3 year job that I couldn't handle because of a change in management. I was nervous because I was leaving all my colleagues from the previous place.

As it turned out I fit their coffee culture perfectly. I loved making drinks, being on cash and grabbing food items and bonding with customers as well as co-workers. My manager has been amazing; really understanding and always coaches partners in a constructive, polite way. She would always make time to be on the floor if we needed her, instead of hiding in the back doing administrative work. She would even get down and scrub floors or sinks too!

There's always something new at Starbucks; a new drink, food item, merchandise, event, etc. So I never get bored, and I always get to sample!

After 8 months I got promoted to a shift supervisor and it was the first time in a job I felt that the higher ups actually acknowledged my effort and dedication. I am still with Starbucks and I intend to stay there for the foreseeable future.

The company itself is amazing as well. They provide benefits through Manulife (how many coffee shops can say that), offer tuition reimbursement for students and have a CUP fund for partners in need (ie. medical emergency, loss of property, etc.). On a weekly basis I get to take home free coffee and I also get free drinks on shift; otherwise 30 percent off everything at other stores. You can also pick up shifts at other stores - provided you don't reach overtime - – more... so there's never a shortage of hours.

The only downfall would be District and Regional Management. Usually people in these positions would be hired as is, rather than promoted from within. Because of this, they can occasionally have unreasonable demands because they don't really know what it's like being in the store working.

I initially liked Starbucks as a consumer, admittedly because of their branding. But as an employee, I love the company and what they do for their people. – less
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Starbucks: from a Barista's experience
Starbucks Barista (Former Employee), North Vancouver,Vancouver, CanadaMay 25, 2012
Pros: 30% discount, complimentary beverages, great benefits, engaging managment
Cons: long, early hours, caffeine withdrawal after a shift
Barista's at Starbucks are the partners that work hard to make sure each customer gets a drink that is to the quality standard that Starbucks trains it's partners to achieve.. for each customer. Upon entering Starbucks for a shift, I would begin by ordering myself a complimentary partner beverage and proceed to the back room to chat with co-workers and drink coffee. Work would begin with a time punch and an "Ok, let's go!" attitude which coffee often contributes to the morning. As a barista I learned to be responsive to the unique shift I was working on any given day. If I was opening, then my responsibilities involved stocking the pastry case and being ready for customer numero uno to arrive directly at 5:30pm. If I was a mid shift, I might have duties beyond that of serving customers coffee and pastries. I might be a pre-closer responsible for cleaning the washrooms, sweeping and mopping the floors, restocking the condiment stands and changing the garbage and the organics. If I was closing barista, then I would be bar-closing, which meant cleaning down the entire machine and work surfaces including the cold beverage station and fridges, and ensuring the espresso was stored for freshness. The diversity of tasks under the job title barista were new to me and I appreciated management greatly in their in depth training. Working alongside other baristas under a Supervisor at Starbucks, I quite enjoyed the interactions we got to have while serving customers and keeping the store running cleanly and efficiently. The hardest part of the job is time management and co-ordination of – more... tasks. I had to make sure that I was accomplishing my tasks throughout the night, and not forgetting them as I served customers as well, so that the store could close on time.The most enjoyable part of working at Starbucks as a barista was the fun interaction with co-workers and regulars as we worked to provide great service to our customers. – less
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Busy workplace with excellent service
Shift Supervisor (Current Employee), Edmonton, AlbertaMarch 31, 2015
I have worked at Starbucks for about two years now and I love working there. I enjoy many things about working at Starbucks, I love what they're about, I love the customers, I love the environment and I love my coworkers. Working there gives me a sense of family and belonging, we all work very well together and we're a tight knit group. Starbucks emphasizes very much on their excellent customer service, it's one of the first things they teach you when you begin training. The main goal is to let everyone leave our store with the same sense of belonging that working there will give its employees. We strive to connect with each customer, welcome them, teach them and deliver the ultimate experience. I love that. I love being able to connect with complete strangers over a cup of coffee.
My position here is a Shift Supervisor. This requires many responsibilities and is quite a test of skill. As a Shift, you need to have excellent time management, your day need to be planned perfectly. You are responsible for sending people on breaks, keeping track of inventory, planning for tomorrows sales and making sure you and your coworkers are maintaining the store. You are who the team looks to when times are stressful, you become the role model for everyone else which is a responsibility I eagerly took when I received the position. My store gets very busy which means that sometimes my partners get stressed out and that puts more strain on me, this is one of the downsides of the job. There are times when we are understaffed and much too busy and it's up to me to keep a strong head on my shoulders – more... and push my team to stay relaxed and get through the rush. I've learned a lot of value when it comes to being a leader, if I crumble then my whole team does so I have no problem with keeping a good face and being reassuring as well as encouraging. I've learned a lot about time management and customer service and how much of an impact the little things have. I've learned much about organization and how essential it is to have the skills of a team player and being good at working alone. – less
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Not the Perfect Cup of Coffee
Brand Manager (Associate) (Former Employee), Toronto, ONJuly 23, 2014
Pros: free coffee, team building events, decent benefits, great brand name on your resume
Cons: no work-life balance, little opportunity for advancement, un-competitive salary, self-involved management
While I certainly learned a lot during my tenure at Starbucks Canada, the Canadian division is not a great place to work. Work-life balance is non-existent and anyone below Senior Manager level is treated like a cog in the machine. There is very little room for advancement as the older members of the Marketing team refuse to leave, to the detriment of the organization. Don't be fooled by the title Brand Manager or Assistant Brand Manager - you aren't really managing anything from a marketing perspective and this is not your typical brand management role. The majority of the job is determining what US products to pick up and release in the Canadian market and lots of number crunching. If you're looking to stretch and extend your strategic and creative skills this is not the place for you. This is an operations driven organization so the majority of resources, effort and focus are on developing employees working in the stores. It doesn't really make the "behind the scenes" people feel appreciated or inspired.

Management at Starbucks, while incredibly polite and friendly, are neither overly creative nor inspiring. Looking to be a mover and shaker? Starbucks looks good on your resume and you'll gain a lot of transferable skills but you won't do anything earth shattering. And don't think about speaking your mind because they aren't overly receptive to individuals who challenge the status quo, provide opinions that go against the majority or raise concerns about issues. There have been some serious culture issues with the company, especially around recognition and appreciation of – more... staff.

Net-net, I had a great time learning about the business and definitely picked up some great skills but I wouldn't recommend working in Marketing at the Canadian operation. – less
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An experience well needed to grow
Barista/Learning Coach (Former Employee), Unionville, OntarioMay 22, 2013
Pros: great customers, excellent employees, motivational goals set every shift.
Cons: management communication issues made the workplace quite uneasy to work in.
Honestly, a very enjoyable job solely based on most staffing and customer interaction. It taught me the value of seeing a customer's genuine smile after every cup of coffee while providing my honest and earnest gestures. Initially, my time with co-workers grew a bound that can truly allow us to be called partners as opposed to just fellow employees. These other driven individuals created a warm, but thriving work environment that allowed me to grow both as a person and as a sales associate.

Management however was the biggest issue I've had with the company. The turn over rate at my store had 6 managers in the past 2 years. This was a huge impact considering we had the highest volume store in our district. A lot of the time which management hired was not used to such a high volume store and had distribution of workload in a very miniscule manner. Also, appreciation was hugely lacking for efforts often go unseen as to how much work is actually done. The latest hire, an external, caused such a stir that customer complaints became a frequent, and worker morale dropped to an all time low. I feel the lack of communication and genuine care was given to my shift supervisors and fellow barista's.

The management issues were probably the hardest part of the job for me. Without a healthy superior-subordinate relationship, the work place isn't as aspiring as it could be. It was difficult to work with such poor time management and workload distribution; but it made me all the more a learner to deal with these situations.

That being said, it's always the customers that keep me coming back. – more... The genuine appreciation of delivering excellent service and have that reciprocated to you in their eyes is truly vivid to me. – less
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Productive, fun environment, learned a lot about the industry.
Barista (Former Employee), Lasalle, QCMarch 26, 2015
Pros: Happy environment
A normal day at work consists of opening up the store.
Preparing all required material for the day.
Opening takes about two hours of prep work.
Then the store opens and there is a rush to get people their morning coffee boosts before they start their day.
Then the normal routines begin. Logs need to be filled in throughout the day, menus changed depending on the hour and stock being refilled depending on how quickly things run out from your morning set up.

I learned a lot working at Starbucks. Even though it was a small store of it (Located in the Angrinon Target location) there was always constant line ups, which helped me learn a lot about time management and how to work under fast paced and stressful conditions. The best part about the fast paced environment was that there was never a dull moment, and when you finally did stop..it was time to go home!

The manager at the Starbucks location in Angrinon was wonderful.
She was extremely dedicated and by being such a few number of people we were all really closed to her. During my training she took her time with me and let me repeat a million questions when I panicked. I believe because she led us so well, we worked so well.

My co-workers were also amazing, we were all very close and depended on each other without having to worry that someone was going to let us down. We all worked as a team really well and the customers enjoyed such a welcoming environment.

I think the hardest part of the job was sometimes keeping up with all the customer we had. There was never a stop to a day so if you fell behind a little – more... you really really fell behind. Luckily we worked with amazing people and everything (usually) ran smoothly!

The whole experience of working at Starbucks was really enjoyable. I loved coming to work and I really learned a lot and made a lot of really great friendships. – less
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Absolutely awesome co-workers
Barista (Current Employee), Surrey, BCFebruary 10, 2015
Pros: benefits, co-workers, free drinks and discount, fairly flexible hours
Cons: customers, policies, can't move up, not enough hours, low pay
I don't know if it's just my store, but my co-workers are just amazing people to work with. They are the sole reason I am still working there at the moment.

The job itself is fine. It's retail, it gets old fairly quickly. The customers are really hit or miss. Some are very entitled and feel they can treat us like their slaves. And the 'always say yes' policy at Starbucks really doesn't help us employees deal with this properly. There is really no way to tell a customer off if they are being rude, you basically just have to give them whatever they want, and they continue to act and demand things every time they come into the store; even if it goes against other Starbucks policies (such as the re-fill policy). If Starbucks could change their attitude it would benefit both the partners and the sincere customers who don't demand free drinks and this and that just because they can. It's really unfair.

It's also hard to move up and get full-time hours. The general weekly hours everyone gets are around 20; more if you're a shift, but again becoming a shift isn't very easy in my store as we have so many already.

Making the drinks can be fun, and the free drinks during your shift are nice but I'm pretty sure they are the cause of a few cavities I got recently ;P. The benefits are really handy once you get them, but you can only apply for them once a year, so some co-workers missed the deadline and are without for a year again. That's hard as the pay is pretty low, with the low hours. Very hard to live on if you're not at home any more or covered by school.

It's a pretty good job – more... if you're in school - high-school or post-secondary - but as a full-time job it's probably not your best bet for long term work unless you're a shift and want to work your way up. – less
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Once Great, Still Good
Barista (Former Employee), Prince George, BCApril 16, 2014
Pros: co-workers, free coffee, flexible hours
Cons: douche bag customers, restrictive dress code
I started my time as a barista in 2006, at a time when the company still felt fresh and vibrant, at least to me. What I loved about the company back at the start was the feeling that one could actually contribute to the company's direction, be it products, policies, or just overall success. There was a certain cachet to wearing the green apron back then, or at least it seemed so.

I recall a company-wide management overhaul few years in (2009?) that really shook things up policy- and product-wise, and for me the sheen of the place never recovered from that. I was especially annoyed that upper management began to attempt micro-managing customer experiences because to me the freedom to create that experience based on the individual was the real Starbucks I had signed up for - connect, discover, respond.

Of course, 7 years is a long time to sling people's beans, and so perhaps my jadedness is more the result of overstaying my welcome than anything else, but at the end I was quite done with the sciolistic act you would get from customers.

The people are both the best and worst part of the job. Generally, the people behind the bar are some of the best you'll ever meet. There are some great customers, too, but unfortunately at the end of a long day it's the fatuous ones you remember, and since Starbucks makes its money by catering to the overindulgence of the North American ego I can only say that a lot of hebetating dolts end up coming to Starbucks for their affirmation. And a decaf triple soy half-sweet sugar-free hazelnut no foam extra hot extra drizzle caramel macchiato, which – more... you will make perfectly but they will still find something to complain about for next time. – less
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wasn't what i was told
ASM (Former Employee), London, ONFebruary 26, 2015
Pros: free lb coffee or tea a week, 30% off, when not at work on anything in store, free beverages during work, staff i worked with was amazing and friendly
Cons: mis-leading, pay was mediocre, amount of work is repetitive and more labour than should be
I applied as Store Manager, had 3 phone interviews with HR. She than offered me the ASM (Assistant Store Manager) position and telling me id be better off starting this off. (even though my past experience as Banquet Manager and Restaurant Manager wasn't enough to her, she told me Starbucks was totally different management). I than met with District Manager in person. Everything i was informed seemed positive and was looking really forward to it all. The benefit, the Perks, it was all good, but it was a huge distraction to what the job really was.
I was told i was first hired because of my past professional experience in dealing with customers/ guests, and my personality being so outgoing.
4 weeks training- 2 weeks barista, it was so fun and i learned so much.
2 weeks training as Shift Supervisor- a lot of work, it was still fun, but repetitive work in counting inventory, and they have a few added steps that waste so much labor work. i ended up being transferred to the actual store i was suppose to work, and become that ASM i was being trained for. when i started at the property, they started to RE-train me with everything i had already been trained on rather than starting to train and work as the ASM.

if you have past managerial experiences you will know what a manager is all about. The management position is not what you;; expect. The DM controls with fear, and it seems that head office has no trust in their stores.
through out my training i barely had the time to communicate with the customers, make the connections.
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Fantastic Co-workers!
Shift Supervisor (Former Employee), Vancouver, BCNovember 23, 2015
Pros: Great benefits; awesome environment; free coffee on shift; fantastic people
Cons: During slow times, hours do get cut so be prepared to pick up shifts at other stores.
There is something to be said for the simple joy that comes in preparing a quality cup of coffee for someone else and being able to share a smile with them.

Starbucks Coffee Company was my first real job where I was out on my own and it was an ideal first employer. Having worked there I can see why so many people choose to make it their career if they can afford to.

You learn to decipher that previously incoherent code on the back of your mug, you get to interact with both regulars and newcomers alike and develop excellent people skills, and of course, you get to learn how to make the wide range of drinks they offer from a latte to a frappucino.

Management varies from store to store, but overall I have found every in-store manager to be an admirable worker and a great leader. A lot of the skills and lessons my first manager passed on to me re ones I will keep with me for the rest of my life.

Your co-workers though are the true joy of this job! Starbucks has always attracted such an amazing array of people to it's folds, and a lot of my co-workers have become people I maintain contact with even today as we moved onto to new opportunities.

The hardest part of the job is maintaining an engaging customer connection when you become really busy. It's a little harder to remember to keep chatting and connecting with your customers when your line of drinks circles the bar.

The most enjoyable part of the job is the atmosphere! Starbucks is a truly fun place to work if you enjoy connecting with people, co-worker and customer alike!
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Great people to work with
Shift Supervisor (Former Employee), Halifax, NSJune 17, 2015
Pros: flexible shifts
Cons: hire up decisions often don't make sense
The job was pretty straight forward, once you got the hang of routine to make bevearges. The job however, was not advertised as a sales job nor did it seem like one when I first started but a few years ago it has begun being run more and more like other businesses losing its niche.
The customer focus used to be the most important thing now it appears to be sales and volume. The playbook routine is broken and doesn't work in most stores. Managment appears brainwashed to many policies and decisions by the hire ups.
The people I worked however, were some of the most interesting and fun people I have ever met. The job is extremely flexible and it is usually easy to find someone to cover the shifts.
The incentives to sell are basically zero but managment will constantly coach you on selling despite zero incentive to do so.
They give stocks to employees but its not an amount that makes me want to take ownership of the company. They frequently outside hire for district managers and managers despite their being more than capable people working in the stores they just want someone who is done it before even if they don't understand what starbucks culture is. overall I left after one day of working at a new store when I realized the playbook routine left employees in one position for hours on end and didn't give any room for conversation between employees that usually helped bridge to customers and allowed me to get them to trust me and SELL better. the company is heading in a direction more compairable to mcdonalds and if you own stocks in starbucks i'd sell now.
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Great environment with flexible hours.
Barista (Current Employee), Ottawa, ONApril 26, 2013
Pros: cheap lunches provided by hotel, great environment
Cons: hours/positions based on seniority, shift cuts
- Working for a licensed, independently owned Starbucks in a hotel.
- Above average pay with good benefits and the ability to pay into RRSPs.
- I learned that a healthy environment is the best environment to work in. Management was excellent at resolving any and all conflicts and took all considerations to heart.
- I learned that attention to detail while working in a fast paced environment is more important than most people think.
- The hardest part of the job is dealing with the fact that hours are based on seniority. I feel that even though some employees have seniority over myself (mostly supervisors), they don't care about the job like I do. If they do not want to do the job properly, they should give it to someone who does do the job properly and who can enforce the rules and perform the tasks that a supervisor should.
- The most enjoyable part of this job is connecting with your customers. If a customer comes in everyday, and they order the same thing every morning, you shouldn't have to ask them anymore. Sometimes just having their drink ready for them, or having it started before they order, can make their day run a little bit smoother by not having to wait around. It also makes them feel special and/or appreciated and welcomed, and is likely to make them return. Often people thank me for knowing exactly how they take their coffee or lattes, and commend us on the fast (yet reliable) service we provide to them.
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I absolutely loved working for Starbucks!
Barista/Shift Superviosor (Former Employee), Toronto, ONFebruary 23, 2014
Pros: stock options, 30-50% discount on any product, partner markouts (free weekly pound of coffee or tea) tips vacation pay
Cons: on extremely rare occasion, a rude/violent customer
Normally my day would start in the early morning hours. Upon arrival to the store, I would first, ensure that I am accompanied by one of my colleagues, since it was against the companies policy to carry out any business operation alone. When the store would open, I'd ensure that the closing shift did everything properly, would make notes in regards to what was, if anything substandard for a future discussion. Then I would start either, working on the pastry case or setting up the daily operation (till count, setting up of POS (point of sale systems)), this would entirely depend on the role assigned to me as a shift supervisor or a barista. Upon successful set up we would open the store and greet our regular morning crowd. Soon after we would be joined with another team member to deal with the morning rush. Once the rush would slow down, I'd start working on clerical/paperwork, eg. make an inventory, make an order for store supplies, post any new policy/messages from the head office on the store's notice board etc. in between the aforementioned errands, I was assigned the position of shift supervisor, I would oversee and ensure that the partners breaks are allocated and taken. Upon completion of my shift, as a shift supervisor, I would carry out a handover to the closing person and leave the store.
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It's a fun place to work, great staff, good benefits, and flexible hours.
Barista (Former Employee), Burnaby, B.C.July 28, 2014
Pros: happy work environment
Cons: lack of full-time hours, and minimal compensation.
Starbucks is a great place to develop customer service skills as well as social skills. It has very flexible hours, and a lively atmosphere. A typical day at work involves cash and customer handling, making a variety of beverages, some dish washing and store cleanliness is involved throughout the day. I learned how to be in several places at once, as I worked in one of the busier locations at Metrotown. It was an exciting and energetic atmosphere. They have a very thorough training procedure and the staff are helpful and kind. Our manager was very laid back and considerate of employees personal lives. He trusts the staff with the well being of the store and was very understanding. The coworkers I had a Starbucks were some of the best I've ever had the pleasure of working with. They are very supportive, and offer coaching when needed. It has a very strong family vibe to it. The hardest part of working at the Metrotown location was the size of the facility, as it was very small and very busy. There were often not enough places to fit customers during our rushes. The raises could be better. They offer competitive wages, but start you at minimum wage, and you get a 10-16 cent raise once every six months. The most enjoyable part of Starbucks was definitely the working environment, very friendly, very social, very happy place to work. I also loved the flexibility with scheduling.
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Fun, fast paced environment, excellent for part time employment
Store Manager (Current Employee), CalgarySeptember 23, 2014
Pros: benefits, stock options, free beverages while working, free pound of coffee each week
Cons: work/life ratio
A typical day at work involves arriving in the morning and having 30 minutes to get the store set up to open. The expectation is to be open 10 minutes before posted time and stay open 10 minutes after posted closing time. Mornings are busy with customers on their way into work. There is something to be learned every day, whether it's a new policy or getting to know a new customer. Store managers are told to run their stores as if it's their own business, however, district managers visit on a weekly basis to coach and provide guidance. Store managers in each district work to help each other out with daily issues whenever possible. The most difficult part of the store managers position is staffing. It is difficult to find time off the floor to conduct interviews and do hiring/training. Work/life ratio for a store manager is also a stressful issue as managers are required to work as many hours as needed for their store's successful operation. If coverage cannot be found for a partner calling in sick, or not showing up, the store manager is required to come in to cover the shift. You are told not to log the extra hours in the computer and only get paid for 40 hours. No time off in lieu is given for extra time worked. The most enjoyable part of the position is the partners you get to work with, and the customers you get to know.
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Great people to work with.
Barista (Former Employee), Vancouver, BCMay 15, 2013
Pros: free coffee to drink and free pound of coffee a week.
Cons: swing shifts, barely livable wage in vancouver.
I enjoyed this job. My average day depended on the shift I had as I did openings, mid-shift, and closing shifts. I was responsible for setting up pastries, brewing coffee, cleaning washrooms, the frontage of the store, dishes, and the back end and espresso machines. I also cashiered, mixed drinks, prepared food and stocked products. When I started with the company the store I was initially hired for had a fire, and then the manager who hired me left, during the period I started working we received a new manager who then left within the month for another job, we then received a new manager who was promoted, and received another new manager. It isn't that any of the management was bad, but that I never really got to experience much long-term management, primarily random supervisors as stand-ins managed. The one issue I had with working at Starbucks was that I often had to swing shifts between opening and closing, this would mean at times that I left work at 11:30pm, and had to be back for 5:00am this caused a certain amount of stress on my life which is why I rated the balance low. I had no problem working either shift, I just did not enjoy swinging with a short period from one to the other. Aside from that the benefits were really good, however for a city like Vancouver the salary was very low, and it was a barely livable wage (in most other cities the wage would have been decent).
Claimed Profile
Revenue
more than $10bn (CAD)
Employees
10,000+
Industry
Links
Starbucks website
Starbucks on LinkedIn

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