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Royal Canadian Mounted Police
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10 reviews

Royal Canadian Mounted Police Employer Reviews

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Excellent flexibility
MANAGER OF BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES GROUP (Current Employee), Edmonton, ABJanuary 2, 2014
Manage a large group of employees conducting several different policing support units.
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good place to work
Offset Press Operator (pr-ofo-4) (Former Employee), Ottawa, ONJune 11, 2013
Pros: gym in the building
Cons: got outsourced
I worked there for a period of 8 years. I enjoyed my time there although it was cut short because of outsourcing.
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A great career, will miss it when I move on.
Forensic Identification Specialist - Corporal (Current Employee), Terrace, BCApril 17, 2013
Pros: flexiablity and excellent work/life balance.
Cons: seeing the lows of human misery and selfishness. sounds dark, but it is reality.
I have experienced eight transfers with the force and have lived in two Provinces and two Territories.
A typical day, can start off with a request for forensic services from a client detachment ( Forensic Services is a support service to front line policing) to process a crime scene for evidence.To preparing and completing expert witness reports for – more... crown counsel ( Federal and provincial).
I have learned to pay attention to detail, patience, perseverance.
Management - Anyone can be taught to manage, few can lead effectively.
Most of my co-workers are solid, dedicated people.
Dealing with the death of a small child. Seeing the justice system fail society.
Seeing all the long hours and work, come to fruitation. – less
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Adminstrative Assistant
Federal internship position (Former Employee), Charlottetown, PENovember 5, 2012
A federal internship position as an employee within ā€œLā€ Division of the RCMP. I have to say I enjoyed every aspect of it, and feel very proud to have had this opportunity. Much of my experience is transferable, specifically in my time spent with the RCMP and administration
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fun and good expereice to learn more about your community
Office / Reception ( Volunteer) (Current Employee), Surrey, BCOctober 14, 2012
Pros: have expereicence, know lots of things you never thought of, make a difference
Cons: if new people come in office, then there is no unity
End of the day .make you feel good by atleast helping one person, learning things which can make community safer and good, everyday is enjoyable day
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fun workplace
Training Coordinator (Former Employee), ottawa, onSeptember 24, 2012
i got to be in charge of improving the training equipment and coordinating the logistics.
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Fast paced environment
DETACHMENT SERVICES ASSISTANT (Current Employee), AlbertaJune 26, 2012
Pros: steady, predictable job.
Cons: long hours, sporadic training. no room for advancement.
Learned the value of time management and cooperation.
Multitasking is your typical day, and being able to deal effectively with a stressful workplace is a must.
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Policing Experience
Det. Commander Victoria Intl. Airport - Security (Current Employee), Retired - RCMPolice (25 yrs. Service)June 15, 2012
Pros: meaningful employment & job satisfaction
Cons: taxes
- Maintaining a hands on professional positive attitude , protecting assets, helping people.
- everyday is a learning experience.
- management ( demanding accountability)
- respect & honesty
- Time & risk management
- helping people.
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there is no such thing as promotion w/i the public service
Administrative Assistant/Admin Support (Former Employee), Vancouver, BCApril 26, 2012
Pros: regular pay cheque, benefits, flex work week, 37.5 hour week!
Cons: no promotion system
Fact; You are required to compete for each position that is created or that becomes vacant. You could be asked to "act" in a vacant higher classification/paying position for 1-3 years and then have to compete for it and not obtain it. I find that where other Federal Departments advertise within their department, RCMP advertise most often outside of – more... their Department for competitions which could mean a "higher classification and pay level for someone within the RCMP who, in my opionion, is very qualified and suitable to do the job as proven through their "acting". Their is no loyalty by management in their departments or the RCMP to the people (PS's) who work within. Most often the excuse for not obtaining the position is "suitability", which tends to be subjective and whether or not you are "liked" by whoever is on the board or managing that particular unit. It is discouraging when you continually compete for slightly higher classifications which you have either acted in or obtained the necessary training and courses and cannot pass the "competition" process and someone from another department or from outside is successful. However, you may have been continually told that you're doing a great job! Someone with no RCMP experience, someone without the courses and training that your own department has provided and paid for in order for you to obtain "certification" . Once you are "black balled" in HR or by a "superior" who you may have had a conflict with (and yes it happens when you have a difference of personality or opinion with some regular members or officers who may supervise public servants) you will be continually followed by that, whether or not you obtain the suggested education (certifications) and training to do other positions better. My advise: Work for other Federal Departments if you can and avoid the RCMP. The culture is sudo-militaristic and really, RM's do not have much interaction or respect for what their support people do. There is a definite division and feel between RM's, CM's, and PS's and it is not a healthy, happy environment. (I have experience with other Federal Department and it was much better being all PS's, with the professional research and lab technitions...no RM's and no CM's.) Energy Mines and Resources was good for me. (Now called Natural Resources Canada).
For me, the hardest part of my RCMP positions is the no respect aspect and no loyalty from your employer/supervisors and Regular Members's and Civilian Member's.
For me, the most enjoyable part of the job is the interaction with the public and clients and the satisfaction of knowing you make a difference to them.

Cons: The long drawn out competition process ... there is no "promotion" system for Public Servants as it is a Union environment and everything is "competition". This gets very tiresome if you tend to be a non-competitive type of person. One lady who has worked here from highschool - 25 years - competed a couple of times and was so discouraged and stressed by it, that she never competed again. She is still a CR04 and will likely retire at that classification, when she is the most knowledgeable and a real "go to" person for everyone from the director down to new staff hires.(not me). Reclassification of her position was also denied, yet she really does a lot more than her job description.

You can compete, get screened in, test, and qulaify and pass everything and then have them decide to put a "hiring priority" from another department or hire someone "on contract" for a year and not fill the position...or cancel the competition after all the trouble you've gone through. You have to understant that every competition takes anywhere from 3-18 months to fill from the time you apply! There can be up to 3 times you need to go for testing and interviews, meaning you have to take time off your regular job.

Other Federal Departments seem to be quicker at filling positions...I may be wrong, but it is my experience with the RCMP that their HR department is very lacking in support for the applicants and all about supporting the managers. Other Federal HR departments I have been in contact with over the years for other competitions have given me more guidance, information and help than our RCMP one has ever done. Ours, I find, is almost indifferent and does not want to deal with the competitors in either helping them find more suitable positions or providing guidance and advice. Perhaps it's due to their lack of staff or their high turn over?

I find myself laughing here, because I sound like Rodney Dangerfield, "I get no respect!" Oh well, it's a job and it's all pensionable. I am fortunate to have one at this point with all the cut-backs and the way the economy is. (April, 2012)
I am a naturally happy and enthusiastic person, but have found it grinds on you after many years of redundancy and ineptness with the system, and seeing people who are really non-workers getting higher classifications and making a lot more money than someone who has great work ethics and really has a huge store of practical work knowledge, and has proven themselves capable. This happens simply because they are good at the "competition" process. That's throughout the Federal Public Service, not just RCMP, and remember the "suitability" part of the competition is really subjective...it still boils down to how the boss perceives you!

If I had it to do all over again and was much younger...I would get a degree and do something that there is always a demand for and more satisfying where you can make a difference...dentistry, nursing, doctor, mortician, accountant, plumber, electrician, computer tech, IT trades person, teacher, social worker...and skip the Federal Public Service and the RCMP altogether. After your pension is locked in as a public servant- 10 years - it seems that it tends to create a different mind-set in the public servant about such things - you limit yourself!

If you're under 35 - go out and do something else with your life! Don't become a public servant! It is too mind numbing! Go for the gusto! – less